1. image: Download

    More Crustaceapods, paintings by Robert Steven Connett, at butdoesitfloat.
This little beauty is called Seapods and is available as a print from the artist.

    More Crustaceapods, paintings by Robert Steven Connett, at butdoesitfloat.

    This little beauty is called Seapods and is available as a print from the artist.

     
  2. Posters by Gunter Rambow

    More at butdoesitfloat in a nice clean template, via The Casual Optimist.

     
  3. image: Download

    edithshead:

from Koto Bolofo: Venus Williams editor Patrick Remy(Steidl, 2008)

fashion shot of Venus in…feathers??

    edithshead:

    from Koto Bolofo: Venus Williams 
    editor Patrick Remy
    (Steidl, 2008)

    fashion shot of Venus in…feathers??

     
  4. image: Download

    nprbooks:

Today, July 21, is Ernest Hemingway’s birthday. To celebrate, here are a three things you may not have known about him:
He (supposedly) invented the cocktail Death in the Afternoon. In a collection of celebrity recipes he instructed readers to “Pour one jigger absinthe into a Champagne glass. Add iced Champagne until it attains the proper opalescent milkiness. Drink three to five of these slowly.” (He also shared the recipe for his favorite hamburger.)
He rewrote the ending the A Farewell To Arms 39 times before he was satisfied.
He named his fishing boat Pilar.

HBD, Ernie!
Image via the National Archives

Too lazy to post this on the day. But some of you may appreciate the recipe.

    nprbooks:

    Today, July 21, is Ernest Hemingway’s birthday. To celebrate, here are a three things you may not have known about him:

    1. He (supposedly) invented the cocktail Death in the Afternoon. In a collection of celebrity recipes he instructed readers to “Pour one jigger absinthe into a Champagne glass. Add iced Champagne until it attains the proper opalescent milkiness. Drink three to five of these slowly.” (He also shared the recipe for his favorite hamburger.)
    2. He rewrote the ending the A Farewell To Arms 39 times before he was satisfied.
    3. He named his fishing boat Pilar.

    HBD, Ernie!

    Image via the National Archives

    Too lazy to post this on the day. But some of you may appreciate the recipe.

     
  5. image: Download

    dappledwithshadow:

Man Digging, Vincent van Gogh
c. 1885

    dappledwithshadow:

    Man Digging, Vincent van Gogh

    c. 1885

     
  6. 13:51

    Notes: 188

    Reblogged from rockhalllibrary

    Tags: Punk magazine

    rockhalllibrary:

    Celebrate International Zine Month!

    The history of zines in popular culture dates back to the mid-twentieth century when science fiction fans created their own publications. By the late 1970s, zines were synonymous with the punk rock DIY attitude – anyone with access to a photocopier could produce a zine about their favorite music. In addition to documenting local or regional fan culture, zines often include interviews with performers and reviews of concerts that cannot be found in mainstream publications, so they make a fantastic and unique popular music research resource!

    Punk magazine was created by cartoonist John Holstrom, publisher Ged Dunn, and “resident punk” Legs McNiel in 1975. It popularized the term “punk rock” to describe the music coming out of the CBGB scene, including the New York Dolls, the MC5, Stooges, and Ramones.

    Images: From Punk.

    Very nice tumblr, this one. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archives, no less.

     
  7. 13:48

    Notes: 684

    Reblogged from cabinporn

    Tags: cabinsmountain homes

    image: Download

    cabinporn:

Miners cabin in Sierra Nevada Mountains, California.
Contributed by J.W. Adams.

Probably a bit dark inside this one, but the country would be amazing.

    cabinporn:

    Miners cabin in Sierra Nevada Mountains, California.

    Contributed by J.W. Adams.

    Probably a bit dark inside this one, but the country would be amazing.

     
  8. image: Download

    theparisreview:

“If the essence of jazz exists in the moment of performance, then much of the work of the jazz elegy is to make such music legible while also acknowledging the futility of such a project.”
Chantal McStay on Rita Dove’s elegy for Billie Holiday, who died fifty-five years ago today.

That’s why you’ll find somebody’s on my mind.

    theparisreview:

    “If the essence of jazz exists in the moment of performance, then much of the work of the jazz elegy is to make such music legible while also acknowledging the futility of such a project.”

    Chantal McStay on Rita Dove’s elegy for Billie Holiday, who died fifty-five years ago today.

    That’s why you’ll find somebody’s on my mind.

     
  9. image: Download

    Robert Flaherty’s lost Gaelic documentary has been discovered in the Harvard Film Archive.


Documentary pioneer Robert Flaherty directed the first film made in the Irish language, Oidhche Sheanchais (“A Night of Storytelling”) in 1935 during the production of his now classic film Man of Aran.
Cited in nearly every history of Irish cinema, this short (11 minute) film has been missing, believed lost, since a fire destroyed the only known copies in 1943. A nitrate print of the film, purchased by the Harvard College Library in 1935 at the request of Harvard’s Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, was rediscovered by Houghton Library curators during a cataloging update in 2012.


Oidhche Sheanchais, a fascinating distillation of Flaherty’s belief in cinema as a kind of folkloric art, depicts a typical Irish hearth, where the main cast members of Man of Aran sit, listening to an ancient tale told by famed Seanchaí (storyteller) Seáinín Tom Ó Dioráin. Oidhche Sheanchais is Flaherty’s first work in direct sound and the first “talkie” in Irish Gaelic. It was filmed in the same London studio where the Man of Aran cast had already gathered for the recording of post-synch sound.

Link via The Millions.

    Robert Flaherty’s lost Gaelic documentary has been discovered in the Harvard Film Archive.

    Documentary pioneer Robert Flaherty directed the first film made in the Irish language, Oidhche Sheanchais (“A Night of Storytelling”) in 1935 during the production of his now classic film Man of Aran.

    Cited in nearly every history of Irish cinema, this short (11 minute) film has been missing, believed lost, since a fire destroyed the only known copies in 1943. A nitrate print of the film, purchased by the Harvard College Library in 1935 at the request of Harvard’s Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, was rediscovered by Houghton Library curators during a cataloging update in 2012.

    Oidhche Sheanchais, a fascinating distillation of Flaherty’s belief in cinema as a kind of folkloric art, depicts a typical Irish hearth, where the main cast members of Man of Aran sit, listening to an ancient tale told by famed Seanchaí (storyteller) Seáinín Tom Ó Dioráin. Oidhche Sheanchais is Flaherty’s first work in direct sound and the first “talkie” in Irish Gaelic. It was filmed in the same London studio where the Man of Aran cast had already gathered for the recording of post-synch sound.

    Link via The Millions.

     
  10. image: Download

    From a bunch of illustrations by Rockwell Kent for Moby Dick, on Magic Transistor’s tumblr. See more here.

    From a bunch of illustrations by Rockwell Kent for Moby Dick, on Magic Transistor’s tumblr. See more here.