1. nprbooks:

    FACT: There is such a thing as rainbow bookshelf wallpaper. In case you were wondering.

    -Nicole

    (h/t Buzzfeed Books)

    Some folks will go to no end of trouble…

     
  2. Donal Ryan is a magus of a writer. He has such magic at his disposal to tell a story, which would benefit from being read out loud: The Thing About December has an other-life that is truly theatrical. This is a novel to replenish the reader’s heart and spruce the reader’s soul, although it also makes one doubt we possess such signal things. It’s a force of nature, high artifice and the product of a life-enhancing talent.
    — 

    The Thing About December by Donal Ryan

    Sebastian Barry goes spare for Ryan’s new book, which I’ve just read, having picked it up three days after Christmas. It is beautifully constructed, and Barry’s points about language are well made, if a bit effusive. But then I’ve not read the first novel yet. It will be exciting to get hold of it.

     
  3. 22:36 28th Dec 2013

    Notes: 51

    Reblogged from upperrubberboot

    Tags: enthusiasmbooksTardis

    image: Download

    kidlit:

THIS THIS THIS

    kidlit:

    THIS THIS THIS

     
  4. image: Download

    housingworksbookstore:

ta da (via The 10 Best Books of 2013 - NYTimes.com)


Note to self: obtain the Saunders tout de suite. Have otherwise read The Flamethrowers, and found it satisfying for its flaws and its scope.

    housingworksbookstore:

    ta da (via The 10 Best Books of 2013 - NYTimes.com)

    Note to self: obtain the Saunders tout de suite. Have otherwise read The Flamethrowers, and found it satisfying for its flaws and its scope.
     
  5. infoneer-pulse:


Oyster: A Gorgeous New App Offering Unlimited Books for $9.95 a Month

By now, we’ve all gotten pretty used to not owning stuff—at least in the traditional, hold-it-in-your-hands sense. If you’re anything like me, your DVD collection stopped growing a few years back once Netflix and Hulu bolstered their offerings. And that CD storage stand (hell, even your iTunes account) has probably gathered dust thanks to Spotify and Rdio. But books? Turns out, we’re still content to pay $10 for a paperless novel that we’re not even certain we’ll like or finish. The publishing industry is among the last holdouts in the ongoing transition from owning media to accessing it through a monthly service, but that’s about to change with the launch of Oyster, an app released today for the iPhone that’s looking to transform the way you read and pay for books.

» via Wired



A licensing arrangement. Netflix for books…oh brave new world.

    infoneer-pulse:

    Oyster: A Gorgeous New App Offering Unlimited Books for $9.95 a Month

    By now, we’ve all gotten pretty used to not owning stuff—at least in the traditional, hold-it-in-your-hands sense. If you’re anything like me, your DVD collection stopped growing a few years back once Netflix and Hulu bolstered their offerings. And that CD storage stand (hell, even your iTunes account) has probably gathered dust thanks to Spotify and Rdio. But books? Turns out, we’re still content to pay $10 for a paperless novel that we’re not even certain we’ll like or finish. The publishing industry is among the last holdouts in the ongoing transition from owning media to accessing it through a monthly service, but that’s about to change with the launch of Oyster, an app released today for the iPhone that’s looking to transform the way you read and pay for books.

    » via Wired

    A licensing arrangement. Netflix for books…oh brave new world.
     
  6. Do we know how to display books, I wonder? 

    Via The Millions, from Rocket. Plenty more pictures where these came from.

     
  7. maudnewton:

whatmymothergaveme:

Maud Newton’s mother gave her books:
“I remember watching her, bored and wistful, jealous of the book because it had my mother’s attention and jealous of her because she knew how to disappear into the book … When I could read for myself, she said, I would understand everything differently.” 

That’s my mom and me, Christmas 1971.  The essay I contributed to What My Mother Gave Me is (predictably) about books. When the editor asked for some photos for the anthology’s Tumblr, I sent in a few. 
My favorite, this November 1960 caricature of her driving by a fraternity house in her convertible, is the only likeness I’ve ever seen that captures the intensity of her focus. She didn’t marry the guy whose leg is shown.

These Hemingway and Faulkner story collections were hers in grad school. 

    maudnewton:

    whatmymothergaveme:

    Maud Newton’s mother gave her books:

    “I remember watching her, bored and wistful, jealous of the book because it had my mother’s attention and jealous of her because she knew how to disappear into the book … When I could read for myself, she said, I would understand everything differently.” 

    That’s my mom and me, Christmas 1971.  The essay I contributed to What My Mother Gave Me is (predictably) about books. When the editor asked for some photos for the anthology’s Tumblr, I sent in a few. 

    My favorite, this November 1960 caricature of her driving by a fraternity house in her convertible, is the only likeness I’ve ever seen that captures the intensity of her focus. She didn’t marry the guy whose leg is shown.

    image

    These Hemingway and Faulkner story collections were hers in grad school. 

    image

     
  8. 21:41 2nd Feb 2013

    Notes: 186

    Reblogged from thetinhouse

    Tags: Carl Saganwritingbooks

    Yep, it sure is.

    Yep, it sure is.

    (Source: hammermybones)

     
  9. image: Download

     Card game from around 1890 showing women authors.
Rare Book School at the University of Virginia - NYTimes.com
Link via Michael Orthofer (@MAOrthofer) of the Literary Saloon, on Twitter.

     Card game from around 1890 showing women authors.

    Rare Book School at the University of Virginia - NYTimes.com

    Link via Michael Orthofer (@MAOrthofer) of the Literary Saloon, on Twitter.

     
  10. image: Download

     Sorted Books - Asymptote Journal presents a slideshow from the latest exhibition by Nina Katchadourian, who creates artworks (usually photographs) by arranging books so that the titles can be read in sequence, often as spine piles, rather than covers.
This latest set of photographs uses volumes from the Delaware Art Museum’s M. G. Sawyer Collection of Decorative Bindings. 
The gentle reader, the curved blades, the literary guillotine is my fave, I think.
Link via the Melville House blog, where you will see an example of the spine-based work as well.

     Sorted Books - Asymptote Journal presents a slideshow from the latest exhibition by Nina Katchadourian, who creates artworks (usually photographs) by arranging books so that the titles can be read in sequence, often as spine piles, rather than covers.

    This latest set of photographs uses volumes from the Delaware Art Museum’s M. G. Sawyer Collection of Decorative Bindings.

    The gentle reader, the curved blades, the literary guillotine is my fave, I think.

    Link via the Melville House blog, where you will see an example of the spine-based work as well.