1. 17:45 15th Oct 2013

    Notes: 336

    Reblogged from coolchicksfromhistory

    Tags: boliviahistory

    image: Download

    coolchicksfromhistory:

Juana Azurduy de Padilla (circa 1781-1862)
Art by Lilium Ion (tumblr)
Born in Bolivia to a family of mixed Spanish and Native American heritage, Juana initially planned to become a nun and spent most of her adolescence in a convent.  However, Juana left the convent and never took Holy Orders.  Instead, she became a military leader in the South American struggle for independence from Spain.
Juana married a solider, Miguel Ascencio Padilla, in 1805.  Beginning in 1809, the two participated in a guerrilla war against the Spanish.   At least ninety women are known to have participated in the War of the Republiquetas and Juana was one of the highest ranking, eventually reaching the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.  She led her own legion of male soldiers (Los Lealas).  She also had a guard of twenty five female soldiers (Las Amazonas) who fought alongside her.  Many of Juana’s soldiers were indigenous.  Juana spoke both Quechua and Aymaraand felt a strong connection to her native heritage.  
In September 1816, her husband Miguel was killed in battle.  Up until this point, Juana was famous for the red jacket she wore in battle.  After her husband’s death, she retired the red jacket in favor of black both as a disguise and as a public display of mourning.  The year before she had lost four of her five children to either malaria or malnutrition.
Juana returned home after the declaration of Bolivia’s independence in 1825. She lived the rest of her life in poverty.  
A Bolivian province is named in Juana’s honor.  In 2009, Juana was awarded the rank of General by the Argentine Army.

    coolchicksfromhistory:

    Juana Azurduy de Padilla (circa 1781-1862)

    Art by Lilium Ion (tumblr)

    Born in Bolivia to a family of mixed Spanish and Native American heritage, Juana initially planned to become a nun and spent most of her adolescence in a convent.  However, Juana left the convent and never took Holy Orders.  Instead, she became a military leader in the South American struggle for independence from Spain.

    Juana married a solider, Miguel Ascencio Padilla, in 1805.  Beginning in 1809, the two participated in a guerrilla war against the Spanish.   At least ninety women are known to have participated in the War of the Republiquetas and Juana was one of the highest ranking, eventually reaching the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.  She led her own legion of male soldiers (Los Lealas).  She also had a guard of twenty five female soldiers (Las Amazonas) who fought alongside her.  Many of Juana’s soldiers were indigenous.  Juana spoke both Quechua and Aymaraand felt a strong connection to her native heritage.  

    In September 1816, her husband Miguel was killed in battle.  Up until this point, Juana was famous for the red jacket she wore in battle.  After her husband’s death, she retired the red jacket in favor of black both as a disguise and as a public display of mourning.  The year before she had lost four of her five children to either malaria or malnutrition.

    Juana returned home after the declaration of Bolivia’s independence in 1825. She lived the rest of her life in poverty.  

    A Bolivian province is named in Juana’s honor.  In 2009, Juana was awarded the rank of General by the Argentine Army.

     
  2. This is quite a story - valuable papers by Alan Turing became affordable for the Bletchley Park Trust, thanks to a sad tweet, a viral campaign and some grunt from Google.

    Director of museum operations Kelsey Griffin spotted they had come up for sale at Christie’s auction house, and took matters into her own hands, turning to the social media network Twitter.

    Disappointed to realise that the cost of this “very valuable cache of Turing’s works” was way out of the reach of the Bletchley Park Trust, she posted what she called “a desolate tweet”.

    "The guide price of £300,000 and £500,000 meant that there was absolutely no way the Bletchley Park Trust could afford to buy them," she explained.

    "I sent out a desolate tweet saying ‘If only the trust could afford to buy these for the museum and its visitors’."

    The call for help was spotted by Bletchley supporter and IT journalist Gareth Halfacree, who promptly launched a campaign to save the papers for the nation, which became viral across the Internet.

    "Incredibly he raised £28,500 within 11 days," said Ms Griffin.

    Search engine Google then pledged $100,000 (£63,800) and together with a “significant sum” from a private donor, the trust had £100,000 to spend on auction day.

    Read more. 

    Naturally, I heard about this on Twitter! Via @doctorow and @weelibrarian.

     
  3. 19:42 25th Jan 2012

    Notes: 271

    Reblogged from coolchicksfromhistory

    Tags: historyphotos

    image: Download

    coolchicksfromhistory:

The Chrisman Sisters on a claim in Goheen settlement on Lieban (Lillian) Creek, Custer County, Nebraska.  From left to right  Hattie, Lizzie, Lutie, and Ruth.
Lizzie Chrisman filed the first of the sisters’ homestead claims in 1887 while Lutie filed the following year.  Because of age restrictions on homesteaders, Ruth and Hattie waited until 1892 to file their claims. 
 Many homesteaders found that a single claim could not sustain a family, so combining resources was a good solution. Together, the Chrisman sisters’ claims totaled 1,920 acres. The sisters took turns living with each other in order to fulfill the five-year residency requirement without living alone.

    coolchicksfromhistory:

    The Chrisman Sisters on a claim in Goheen settlement on Lieban (Lillian) Creek, Custer County, Nebraska.  From left to right  Hattie, Lizzie, Lutie, and Ruth.

    Lizzie Chrisman filed the first of the sisters’ homestead claims in 1887 while Lutie filed the following year.  Because of age restrictions on homesteaders, Ruth and Hattie waited until 1892 to file their claims. 

     Many homesteaders found that a single claim could not sustain a family, so combining resources was a good solution. Together, the Chrisman sisters’ claims totaled 1,920 acres. The sisters took turns living with each other in order to fulfill the five-year residency requirement without living alone.

     
  4. image: Download

    Well, I am sick today, officially, but that doesn’t stop me browsing the books on my shelves, where I found reference (thanks, SLV!) to a Venetian printer, Aldus Manutius. I have seen his work fleetingly in the Mirror Of The World exhibition there, but took little note of his credentials, and knew nothing of his history until this afternoon.
A quick bio here at Notre Dame university,  accompanied by this beautiful illustrated opening to the 1502 edition of Dante’s Inferno, is all I’m up to right now. (Note the use of italics, something he pioneered, and his desire to create a portable edition of Dante).
Later, maybe, links to whatever I can dig up on the Hypnerotomachia Poliphii, held at the State Library of Victoria and a landmark in illustrated  books:
In 1499, Manutius printed what is considered one of the finest illustrated books ever published…The work is renowned for the sheer beauty of its typographical design and layout, and the way that it integrates the Roman type designed by Griffo with the book’s 174 woodcuts…
(Des Cowley and Clare Williamson, The World Of The Book. Miegunyah Press and  State Library of Victoria, 2007, p.24)
I found later on, some images at the State Library’s Mirror Of The World website,  though this collection on Flickr is also quite remarkable. 

    Well, I am sick today, officially, but that doesn’t stop me browsing the books on my shelves, where I found reference (thanks, SLV!) to a Venetian printer, Aldus Manutius. I have seen his work fleetingly in the Mirror Of The World exhibition there, but took little note of his credentials, and knew nothing of his history until this afternoon.

    A quick bio here at Notre Dame university,  accompanied by this beautiful illustrated opening to the 1502 edition of Dante’s Inferno, is all I’m up to right now. (Note the use of italics, something he pioneered, and his desire to create a portable edition of Dante).

    Later, maybe, links to whatever I can dig up on the Hypnerotomachia Poliphii, held at the State Library of Victoria and a landmark in illustrated  books:

    In 1499, Manutius printed what is considered one of the finest illustrated books ever published…The work is renowned for the sheer beauty of its typographical design and layout, and the way that it integrates the Roman type designed by Griffo with the book’s 174 woodcuts…

    (Des Cowley and Clare Williamson, The World Of The Book. Miegunyah Press and  State Library of Victoria, 2007, p.24)

    I found later on, some images at the State Library’s Mirror Of The World website,  though this collection on Flickr is also quite remarkable. 

     
  5. 19:16 4th Nov 2011

    Notes: 197

    Reblogged from coolchicksfromhistory

    Tags: techhistory

    ramseynasser:

    In 1842 Ada Lovelace transcribed an algorithm to compute Bernouli numbers to a form tailored for Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, and as a result wrote the first computer program in human history.

     
  6. image: Download

    arcadeparade:

Entrance to the Block Arcade on Collins St, ca. 1913- ca, 1914.

Isn’t that beautiful…thanks, guys.

    arcadeparade:

    Entrance to the Block Arcade on Collins St, ca. 1913- ca, 1914.

    Isn’t that beautiful…thanks, guys.

     
  7. 08:58 20th Sep 2011

    Notes: 134

    Reblogged from coolchicksfromhistory

    Tags: historyphotos

    coolchicksfromhistory:

Maria Milewska, displaced child, WWII era Europe.  Today she would be around 70 years old.  
The US Holocaust Memorial Museum is trying to identify 1,100 displaced children from photos collected by relief agencies after the war.  So far, only a few dozen have been identified.  
The complete collection of photos can be viewed here.  Stories of identified children can be found here.  Previous unidentified photos I’ve posted from the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Jewish Museum of Prague can be found here.

    coolchicksfromhistory:

    Maria Milewska, displaced child, WWII era Europe.  Today she would be around 70 years old.  

    The US Holocaust Memorial Museum is trying to identify 1,100 displaced children from photos collected by relief agencies after the war.  So far, only a few dozen have been identified.  

    The complete collection of photos can be viewed here.  Stories of identified children can be found here.  Previous unidentified photos I’ve posted from the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Jewish Museum of Prague can be found here.

     
  8. 08:31

    Tags: history

    Thanks to Adrian McKinty for this link.

     
  9. Bloomsday on The Drum: Gary Pearce

    It sometimes seems that the fissures of Irish history are inscribed directly into Irish modernism’s contorted literary forms. In the 19th century, the English developed a rich realist literature that drew together individual and social significance in its scenes and characters. In Ireland, during the same period, we have the wild and gloomy Gothic tales of Charles Maturin’s Melmoth the Wanderer and Sheridan Le Fanu’s Uncle Silas. Hard on their heels were modernists like Joyce, Beckett and Flann O’Brien employing fragmentation, montage and stream-of-consciousness.

    Joyce was not a detached cosmopolitan but part of an emergent generation of university-educated Catholics with a stake in debates around nationalist Ireland. This generation also included his friend Francis Sheehy-Skeffington, a pacifist and suffragist, later murdered by a British officer in the Easter Uprising of 1916. For all his rejection of narrow-minded nationalism, Joyce engaged the discussion about what cultural, political and economic forms Irish autonomy and self-determination should take.

    Joyce gives voice to this impulse very strongly at the conclusion of A Portrait of The Artist as a Young Man, where Stephen Dedalus declares:

    I go to encounter for the millionth time the reality of experience and forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated consciousness of my race.

    Joyce here seems to share with cultural nationalism a desire to will independence into being via some transformative act of the imagination. The charge within Joyce’s modernism, however, stems from bringing such aesthetic acts into contact with the “reality of experience” found in the modern world.

    (Source: abc.net.au)

     
  10. The fact that Paul forecasted online shopping, news and banking in 1971 is amazing in itself, but also the sophisticated ways these services could be used—many of which only came to fruition in the last decade. What he describes in “dedicated newspaper” doesn’t look like the early New York Times website, as much as it looks like more recent news feed aggregators, like Google Reader, My Yahoo! or Feed Demon. The report contains not only a description of restaurant websites, but also Open Table-like reservation services. The report remains a true testament to Paul’s vision and foresight.
    — 

    IFTF Celebrates Paul Baran: Forecasting the Internet | Institute For The Future

    Paul Baran, one of the inventors of the technology known as packet-switching, has died aged 84. There’s an obituary at The Guardian, and this quote comes from the blog at The Institute For The Future (IFTF), which he co-founded in 1968.